Jyga Technologies

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In 2009, Dr. Billy Flowers, professor at North Carolina State University, suggested that “the general assumption is that if sows return in estrus within eight days after weaning, then their recovery is complete. If the rebreeding interval is longer, then their recovery wasn’t quite finished when weaning occurred and their subsequent reproductive performance may be compromised.” This assumptions tallies with the conclusion of many studies published which highlight the influence of lactating sows’ feeding on wean-to-estrus interval…


In our first commentary, we talked about sows’ evolution during the last thirty years; how they became today’s hyper-prolific sows along with all the challenges their evolution created. We also overviewed the importance of well feeding lactating sow and the way of doing it efficiently. In our next series of commentaries, we will tackle the impacts and consequences on sow’s productivity. Successively, we will speak of the weaning-to-estrus interval, of the litter size, of the sow’s longevity, of the the farrowing rate and of the gestation feed saving, but today we will begin the series The impact of feeding well lactating sows by exploring the effect on the litter weight.

During the last thirty years, swine farms changed totally before our eyes; the way of administrating them as well as the way of running them changed. Now, the competition between the different farms is strong and sustained. Today, producers do not any other the choice but to be efficient, productive and competitive. Thirty years ago, producers could choose their protocols, their employees and the place where they would put their animals, but their production could not surpass their animals’ potential. Therefore, genetics companies selected the breeding animals in order to improve various genetic traits and finally produce a more prolific animal which produce more milk and fatten more easily…